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Automation Is Coming for SEO Content Farmers | Motherboard

It’s not only bud tenders and Uber drivers who are in danger of losing their jobs to automation these days. A small company in Ohio called AI Writer has created a neural net that can churn out the search engine optimization (SEO) filler currently being created by content mills in places like India and the Philippines. And they managed to do it straight out of college on a shoestring budget.

Automation Is Coming for SEO Content Farmers | Motherboard

Ask HN: Why do companies buy ads when they are the top result in search? | ycombinator.com

Interesting discussion in comments.  Ask HN: Why do companies buy ads when they are the top result in search?

calbear81
This study (http://searchengineland.com/google-research-even-if-you-rank-1-organically-you-can-double-your-clicks-with-paid-search-116713) is a bit old and possibly biased (since sponsored by Google) but when I worked in SEM the experience we had was the same which was the top organic position + the top paid position netted overall more traffic to our site than with just the organic position alone. The other considerations are:1) Brand SEM terms are cheap – if you own the brand, especially something like Squarespace, your ad will have a high quality score and will thus pay a much lower CPC than a competitor trying to vie for eyeballs with your brand name as a keyword. This means that brand terms generally are pretty cheap to buy.

2) Real estate ownership – The more real estate on the page you own the more click share you will get. This will keep other organic listings from getting click share which may mean your competitors will get less traffic off of searches for you.

3) Control over message – Ads provide a high degree of creative control which means you can change the copy and also add on Ad Extensions like sitelinks, app download buttons, “click to call” buttons, etc. These are all things that are harder to control on your organic listing.

The Incredible Shrinking SERP – 2015 Edition – Moz

In the beginning, there were 10 results, and it was good. Then, came expanded site-links and Google’s 7-result SERP. Around the middle of 2014, we started to hear reports of SERPs with odd numbers of organic results – 9, 8, 6, 5, and even 4 page-1 results. At first, these were sporadic and hard to replicate, but they quietly expanded. This is a recent 4-result SERP for “autism speaks”:

via The Incredible Shrinking SERP – 2015 Edition – Moz.

Moving 5 Domains to 1: An SEO Case Study | Moz

Why Change Domains at All?

The rationale for picking a new domain could fill a month’s worth of posts, but I want to make one critical point – changing domains should be about your business goals first, and SEO second. I did not change domains to try to rank better for “Dr. Pete” – that’s a crap shoot at best. I changed domains because my old consulting brand (“User Effect”) no longer represented the kind of work I do and I’m much more known by my personal brand.

That business case was strong enough that I was willing to accept some losses. We went through a similar transition here from SEOmoz.org to Moz.com. That was a difficult transition that cost us some SEO ground, especially short-term, but our core rationale was grounded in the business and where it’s headed. Don’t let an SEO pipe dream lead you into a risky decision.

Why did I pick a .co domain? I did it for the usual reason – the .com was taken. For a project of this type, where revenue wasn’t on the line, I didn’t have any particular concerns about .co. The evidence on how top-level domains (TLDs) impact ranking is tough to tease apart (so many other factors correlate with .com’s), and Google’s attitude tends to change over time, especially if new TLDs are abused. Anecdotally, though, I’ve seen plenty of .co’s rank, and I wasn’t concerned.

via Moving 5 Domains to 1: An SEO Case Study – Moz.

Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool & Crawler Software | Screaming Frog

The Screaming Frog SEO Spider is a small desktop program you can install locally on your PC, Mac or Linux machine which spiders websites’ links, images, CSS, script and apps from an SEO perspective. It fetches key onsite elements for SEO, presents them in tabs by type and allows you to filter for common SEO issues, or slice and dice the data how you see fit by exporting into Excel. You can view, analyse and filter the crawl data as it’s gathered and updated continuously in the program’s user interface.

via Screaming Frog SEO Spider Tool & Crawler Software | Screaming Frog.

New #MarketingNerds Podcast: Ways Content Can Help A Business SEO Presence with Julia McCoy – Search Engine Journal

In this episode of Marketing Nerds, we cover:
Why content is crucial to SEO, the user experience, and more
How Julia manages a team that all works remotely
Strategies in content marketing and SEO
Changes and strategies for content creation in 2015 and beyond

To listen to Marketing Nerds with Julia McCoy: Download or listen to the full episode at the bottom of this post
Subscribe via iTunes!

via New #MarketingNerds Podcast: Ways Content Can Help A Business SEO Presence with Julia McCoy – Search Engine Journal.

Search Engine Marketing Study: .Com Vs. New gTLDs

What About Conversions?
Where it really gets interesting is when we look at the conversions. We set up two different goals for the “diamonds” test. One was the download of a PDF file, and the other was a “Shop Diamond Rings” button located at the bottom of the landing page.

.com vs gtld conversions

There were more conversions on the .com domain name for both the download of the PDF file and for clicks on the “Shop Diamond Rings” button on the site, and the total conversion rate was higher on the .Com domain name than it is on the .Diamonds domain name. So while the Google AdWords tends to favor the new gTLD domain name, consumers appear to favor the .Com (we saw nearly a 20 percent better conversion rate on the .Com domain name).

via Search Engine Marketing Study: .Com Vs. New gTLDs.

The Google AdWords Trap: Chances Are You’re Paying Too Much for Your Google AdWords Clicks | Search Engine People | Toronto

What if I told you that you’re paying too much for your Google AdWords clicks? What if I told you that all that time you’ve invested into building highly-targeted, long-tail Google AdWords campaign was in vain? What if I told you that only a small fraction of your thousands of Google AdWords keywords and ad messages will ever receive any impressions or clicks?Well, very likely some or all of these are true.To see why, let’s suppose you have four Google AdWords keywords:

  • red bikes

  • red bikes sydney

  • men’s red bikes

  • men’s red bikes sydney

via The Google AdWords Trap: Chances Are You’re Paying Too Much for Your Google AdWords Clicks | Search Engine People | Toronto.

Noble Samurai – Google changes SEO forever with it’s Disavow Link Tool – What you Need to Do Right Now…

By giving webmasters the power to “report” bad links they have essentially “crowd-sourced” link-spam detection.

Think about it…

Millions of webmasters will be submitting long lists of low-quality or spammy sites, which Google can then use in its algorithm to penalize not only the sites that are providing these poor quality links, but also those that are linked to by these sites.

This spells disaster for any site that makes it too easy to get a link back to your site. For example, popular “easy” sources of links have traditionally been:

Blog comments

Forums

Web 2.0 sites

Article Directories

Web Site Directories

Poor quality, automated Blog Networks with no human-approval “citation” process

Social Bookmarking Accounts

The “low hanging fruit” sites that promiscuously give out too many links, too easily will most likely see poor pages (or even their entire domain) get penalized.

via Noble Samurai – Google changes SEO forever with it’s Disavow Link Tool – What you Need to Do Right Now….

Google Advertising: Think Nobody Clicks on Google Ads? Think Again! | WordStream

Clicks on paid search listings beat out organic clicks by nearly a 2:1 margin for keywords with high commercial intent in the US.

Now, to be clear here, organic searches still get more clicks overall than paid search – but not all keyword searches are created equal. Keyword searches with high commercial intent – meaning, keywords where a searcher is looking to buy a product or service (for example: “buy stainless steel dishwasher”) – are worth far more to businesses than your basic informational keyword searches (for example: “who is Thomas Edison”). Our research found that for these valuable, high commercial intent keyword searches, paid search advertising listings gave the “free” organic search listings a resounding beat-down. Naturally, we’ve illustrated the results in an infographic. Click to see the full-size infographic:

via Google Advertising: Think Nobody Clicks on Google Ads? Think Again! | WordStream.